1. Landscape Integration    

2. Recreational and slow traffic    

3. Public transport             

4. Car mobility     

5. Spatial connections

           


 

 

Landscape integration

The Sonian Forest has various 'gates' (known landmarks or eye-catchers) that we develop further to avoid disturbance in the rest of the forest.

The current Ring has changed the original relief of the landscape: valleys were filled and hills were dug in. We would like to restore the natural relief, but also increase the safety and fluency of traffic. That is why we propose to draw the Ring as straight as possible, going above valleys and through hills.  

 

 

 

 

 

Recreational and slow traffic

To make cycling to and from Brussels comfortable and safe, the planned bicycle highways (F29, F204 and F205) are constructed with as few crossings with motorised traffic as possible. An additional north-south bicycle connection can make the northern edge of Brussels more accessible for cyclists. In our porposals we also improve the existing cycle paths, bicycle bridges and tunnels.

The village centre of Jezus-Eik and Groenendaal are regarded as important 'gates' to the Sonian Forest. They must be well connected with cycling and walking paths.

 

 

 

 

Public transport

The focus in this study is establishing a fast and smooth connection to Brussels with public transport. In this way we want to offer a qualitative alternative to the car. With this smooth connection we link so-called mobi-points so that passengers can easily transfer from one mode of transportation to another. We are also investigating whether some 'missing links' can be eliminated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Car mobility

Regarding car mobility, our proposals are based on three fundamental goals:

  •    smoother traffic on the main roads (R0 and E411),
  •    converting the connections to Brussels to city boulevards,
  •    preventing cut-through traffic through the village centres.

Completing the Leonard crossroads is an important step towards achieving these goals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spatial connections

The Ring and the E411 cut the Sonian Forest in four and form a barrier for cyclists and walkers. With additional connections over and under the Ring, we want to bring nature areas together again and remove the barrier for vulnerable road users.